Glowing little eyes in the dark

During my stay in Eastern-Uganda I had the chance to visit a small, rural orphanage. The St Kizito Babies home is in Mbale district and currently houses about 40 children between 0 and 5 year-old. The institution was established in 1968 by the Mill Hill missionaries. Children are looked after by nuns and social workers who work very long hours every day to make sure each and every child receive the same amount of care and love. As a parent (father of a beautiful 2 year-old girl) I had very strong and mixed feelings during those hours spent in the orphanage. …

Back from Uganda

My brief journey to Uganda is over and I’m overwhelmed by what I experienced there. I joined a humanitarian (medical) mission in Mbale district, close to the Kenyan border. A small team of doctors volunteered to help diagnose and treat locals for 3 weeks (they are still there) and I documented their work. I have also hiked a bit in the nearby Mount Elgon National park and visited a local coffee plantation which was breathtaking.   I will upload a reportage on the medical mission soon to my portfolio and also another one on a local orphanage which I’ve visited. I’m …

Lagos and the “go-slow”

Lagos is well-known and infamous for its “go-slows” which means traffic jams in Broken / Pidgin English. You can easily spend hours in the car without reaching your destination within the city. I’m not saying Lagos is all about traffic jams, as not the whole city is like that, but certainly there are areas and times of the week when you should only sit in your car if you really have to. Don’t forget that the city has about 20 million, yes million! residents, and the roads weren’t designed to cope with such huge number of people and cars. Anyway, during …

Kasuwan Magani

  Bought a bottle of cold drink from an vendor on the Kasuwan Magani market, between Kajuru and Kaduna. The vendor invited me to enter the hut. It was nice to sit in and chill on a bench after the whole day walk and hike. Just like many spots in the country, this small hut was also multifunctional. It served as a tiny community place where people sat in to talk and have a refreshing drink, and looks like if you needed a tailor, this was your lucky spot as well.

A taste of Naija

I got back from Nigeria a few days ago. Based on my previous trips to faraway destinations, I know that when you return from a world that’s very much different from the one you know, the one you live in, you sort of exist between the two worlds for a few days/weeks (depending on the length of your trip). Mine was very short, only 10 days, but it was a great chance to get a taste on “Naija” as locals refer to Nigeria. I wouldn’t write about statistical details about the country, you can google it or check it on …

Teaser: The Fulani

Fulanis are traditionally nomadic people, herding cattle, goats and sheep. They are the largest nomadic ethnic group in the world, spreading over several territories. The Fulani follow a code of behavior known as “Pulaaku”, consisting of the qualities of patience, self control, discipline, prudence, modesty, respect for others (including foes), wisdom, forethought, personal responsibility, hospitality, courage, and hard work.

Back from Africa

I’m back from Nigeria, 10 days passed by so quickly. Full of memories of amazing places and people and tons of photos taken on the road (including Lagos, Kaduna, Zaria, Ibadan, small villages and some countryside as well). Detailed post coming soon and I’ll upload a selection of photos to my portfolio soon as well. There will also be an exhibition of some of the photos I took. Details will be announced as soon as it’s final. Stay tuned! ;)

Medical preparation for the African trip

There’s a lot of preparation before the trip to Nigeria. Many of them are obviously related to photography, (thinking about concepts, what I’d like to photograph, gather information on where it is to safe to shoot images, and where it’s not advisable at all. Another important step is to find a good and reliable fixer who can help and assist me (translator, driver, someone who has good local connections). I’ve asked around among journalists, photographers, on Lightstalkers and other forums. There are also other preparation steps like vaccinations. There’s only one mandatory vaccination for the Nigerian visa: yellow fever, but …

Nigeria photo trip in October

Recently decided to travel to Nigeria in October, primarily to visit one of my best friends, Tim and also to explore a bit from a traveller and photography perspective. I’m currently sorting out the airplane ticket and see if I need a visa, how long does it take to get it and so on. The very high-level plan is to visit Lagos, stay there for a few days, and then explore the countryside a bit including visiting a few villages. I also have a few concepts about what I’d like to concentrate, what I’d like to document with photographs, but …